Top Ten Things You Must Consider When Making Your C.V [TIPS]


1. Understand Attention Spans

Keep in mind that people read resumes about halfway down the page/screen before deciding if they are going to continue reading, save it for later or hit the delete button. Anything marketable about you should be in the top third of the resume.


2. Make It an Appropriate Length


The optimal length of the resume will depend on your experience. A person with a single year’s experience and a four-page resume is in trouble, as is a person with 10 years experience and a one-page resume. Be concise and try to fit your resume into three pages. Need to cut down? You don’t need an objective — it’s a waste of precious space, unless you are a career changer.


3. General Summaries Bad, Technical Summaries Good


General summaries can help if used sparingly and appropriately. Technical summaries are more helpful, because the first person reading your resume could be non-technical and only knowledgeable enough to look for keywords. However, there should not be a laundry list of every technology you have ever heard about.


4. Dates Matter


Be clear about your dates of employment. Most companies want to see months, not just years — especially if you have some jumps or if you are currently unemployed (i.e. they want to see how long you have been out). It’s better to be upfront than to make them guess.


5. Highlight Accomplishments, Not Just Job Functions


The descriptions of your positions should ideally be a mix of a broad overview and specific accomplishments. That way, recruiters will know what you did day-to-day, but also what effect your activities had on the overall company or department.


6. Quality Writing Still Matters


Long-winded paragraphs or bullets are mind numbing, but short choppy sentences can appear simplistic. The ideal resume should have a combination of short paragraphs and bullets — or even just bullets. If you opt for bullets, combine related activities into one bullet where appropriate to save room.


7. Use Action Verbs


The most overused phrases on resumes are “responsible for” or “participated in.” It’s hard to know if you were just a bystander or a true contributor or even a leader on a project. It’s okay to use these terms once or twice, but it’s much better to use something like “managed,” “completed,” “administered,” “developed,” etc. If you are having trouble coming up with action verbs, Thesaurus.com should be your new best friend.


8. There Are No Rules About Education Placement


Education placement is variable. If you went to a particularly good school, have an advanced degree or have a very relevant degree to the types of roles you are pursuing, then it might be worth putting at the top, but it’s okay for education to be at the bottom, too.

The same applies for certifications — but if you have many, then it might consume too much space at the top. Assuming your resume has the experience to back up the certifications, your prospective employer will be intrigued enough to get to them at the end.


9. People are Not That Interested in Interests


The ubiquitous “Interests” section isn’t really necessary; however, if there’s something you are particularly proud of and it’s short, then feel free to include it at the end of your resume. There is always the possibility that when you put “competitive running” on your resume that the person reading your resume is a marathoner and gives you an interview for that reason. However, you should exclude any activities that could be seen as overly political or offensive.


10. Be Prepared With A Versatile Resume Template


Sometimes it’s valuable to have more than one version of your resume. For example, if your background could be applicable to manager or individual contributor positions, you don’t want to scare someone off with a heavy manager resume for a contributor role or vice versa. However, you should not make yourself crazy writing a new resume for every position that comes up (an especially tempting habit if you are unemployed).

Thanks to http://mashable.com/2012/04/01/tech-resume-tip/

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Seven Things Which Can FAIL You In An Interview [TIPS]


1. Don’t Be Late To the Interview

Even if you car broke down or the subway derailed, do everything you can to get to that job interview on time.

“If you have a legitimate excuse it’s still hard to bounce back,” says Pamela Skillings, co-founder of job coaching firm Skillful Communications. “People are suspicious because they hear the same excuses all the time.”

On the flip side, you don’t want to show up too early and risk appearing desperate, but you do want to be there at least five minutes early or at the very least on time.

2. Don’t Show Up Unprepared

It seems simple, but countless people go on job interviews knowing very little about the company they are interviewing with when all it would take is a simple Google search to find out. As a result, they end up asking obvious questions, which signal to the interviewer that they are too lazy to prepare.

“Don’t ask if the company is public or private, how long it’s been in business and where they do their manufacturing,” says Mark Jaffe, president of Wyatt & Jaffe, the executive search firm. “Sharpen your pencil before you go to school.”

3. Don’t Ask About Salary, Benefits, Perks

Your initial interview with a company shouldn’t be about what the company can do for you, but what you can do for the company. Which means the interview isn’t the time to ask about the severance package, vacation time or health plan. Instead you should be selling yourself as to why the company can’t live without you.

“Your interest should be about the job and what your responsibilities will be,” says Terry Pile, Principal Consultant of Career Advisors. “Asking about vacation, sick leave, 401K, salary and benefits should be avoided at all costs.”

4. Don’t Focus On Future Roles Instead Of The Job At Hand

The job interview is not the time or place to ask about advancement opportunities or how to become the CEO. You need to be interested in the job you are actually interviewing for. Sure, a company wants to see that you are ambitious, but they also want assurances you are committed to the job you’re being hired for.

“You can’t come with an agenda that this job is just a stepping stone to bigger and better things,” says Jaffe.

5. Don’t Turn The Weakness Question Into A Positive

To put it bluntly, interviewers are not idiots. So when they ask you about a weakness and you say you work too hard or you are too much of a perfectionist, chances are they are more apt to roll their eyes than be blown away. Instead, be honest and come up with a weakness that can be improved on and won’t ruin your chances of getting a job.

For instance, if you are interviewing for a project management position, it wouldn’t be wise to say you have poor organizational skills, but it’s ok to say you want to learn more shortcuts in Excel. “Talk about the skills you don’t have that will add value, but aren’t required for the job,” says Pile.

6. Don’t Lie

Many people think its ok to exaggerate their experience or fib about a firing on a job interview, but lying can be a surefire way not to get hired. Even if you get through the interview process with your half truths, chances are you won’t be equipped to handle the job you were hired to do. Not to mention the more you lie the more likely you are to slip up.

“Don’t exaggerate, don’t make things bigger than they are and don’t claim credit for accomplishments you didn’t do,” says Jaffe. “You leave so much room in your brain if you don’t have to fill it with which lie you told which person.”

7. Don’t Ask If There’s Any Reason You Shouldn’t Be Hired

Well meaning career experts will tell you to close your interview by asking if there is any reason you wouldn’t be hired. While that question can give you an idea of where you stand and afford you the opportunity to address any concerns, there’s no guarantee the interviewer is going to be truthful with you or has even processed your information enough to even think about that.

Thanks to Glassdoor.com

How To Take Control of Your Next Job Interview [TIPS]


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At the end of every job interview, you’ll encounter the inevitable question, “Do you have any questions for me?”

While it’s an oh-so-predictable event, many job candidatesaren’t prepared to shine when they reach this final test in the interview. Failing to ask any questions or asking the wrong questions can send the wrong signals.

Stephanie Daniel, senior vice president of career management company Keystone Associates, spoke with us about her thoughts on how job interviewees can take control of their next job interview by asking the right questions. Read on for her thoughts on what to ask and which questions to avoid when it’s your turn to interrogate.

Asking Right Questions


When the interviewer gives you the opportunity to ask your own questions, be prepared. Daniel recommends that interviewees prepare five to seven questions, with the expectation that there will probably only be time to ask just three. “Keep in mind that some of the questions you might have prepared will be answered during the course of the interview, so it’s always a smart idea to have back-ups,” says Daniel.

“Too many job seekers respond to this standard interview question with the standard ‘safe’ responses,” says Daniel. “‘Will I be hearing from you or should I contact you?’ or ‘Why is this position open?’ In this very competitive job market, job candidates cannot afford to ask safe questions. Candidates must show that they are the best candidate by demonstrating that they are looking out for the needs and interests of the interviewer.”

So, what types of questions should you ask? Daniel suggests considering a few of the following:

  • Is there a work issue that keeps you up at night and, given what you know about my background, how do you think I could help?

“Here’s your opportunity to demonstrate a genuine interest in the day-to-day challenges your future manager is facing, Daniel explains. “By asking this question, the interviewer will start to envision you as an employee and will give you some initial thoughts on how you might help solve their most pressing problems.”

  • What is the most gratifying aspect of the work you do for XYZ company? What’s your best advice to someone starting out at this company?

“Asking the interviewer about the most gratifying aspect of the work she or he does helps you better understand what drives them,” Daniel explains. “Drivers include things like making the best product on the market, helping others, making money, curing an illness or creating a hot, new technology, etc. Ask yourself how the interviewer’s drivers align with your own. The answer to the ‘best advice’ question yields valuable insights on what behaviors lead to a successful transition into the company. It gives you clues on what you can do to put your best forward in your potential new role vis-à-vis building new relationships, gaining product knowledge, and avoiding potential pitfalls.”

  • Could you describe your ideal candidate for this job? Why are these qualities important to you?

“The ideal qualifications were probably outlined in the job posting,” says Daniel. “But many of these postings are not actually written by the hiring manager. Here’s your chance to directly ask the interviewer what he views as the most important qualities of the successful candidate and why.”

  • I’m sure you have a number of goals you’d like to achieve in the coming year. Do you have a particular one that is top priority?

“This question allows you to turn your attention to the interviewer and his most important priorities,” says Daniel. “Is there a particular goal the interviewer has talked about that lines up well with some of your current experiences? If so, let the interviewer know how you can contribute.”

Other great questions may revolve around key drivers for employees, what characterizes top performers at the company and whether the interviewer would like to know anything more about the interviewee’s background, says Daniel.


Avoiding Questions with Negative Connotations


To avoid making a bad impression at your interview, Daniel suggests thinking about the connotations behind each of the questions that you’re asking before you ask them. Here are three questions that tend to leave a bad taste in interviewers’ mouths, she says:

“A valid question, yes, but if you ask it too soon, it might appear that you are more concerned about the work schedule than you are about the actual work,” says Daniel.

  • Is there a possibility I could work remotely?

Telecommuting can be a positive thing for both the job seeker and the company, but your timing in asking this question is critical,” Daniel explains. “If asked too soon, it will convey a lack of enthusiasm for getting to know the team and work environment. Demonstrate your interest in the role and potential contributions to the company before inquiring about telecommuting/flex-time, etc.”

  • How long do people typically stay in this position before they move on the next role?

“A desire to grow in the organization is admirable,” says Daniel. “But if you’re asking this question early on in the interview process, the interviewer may question your genuine interest in the position you’ve applied for. Frame the question in a way that demonstrates both your long-term commitment to the company and your professional growth.”


Preparing and Managing Time


Once you’ve chosen which questions you’d like to ask, you can either memorize them or write them down. Daniel advises:

“It is not unprofessional to bring a list of questions on paper. If you choose to write them down, make sure you bring them in a presentable notebook or folder, not on a crinkled, loose-leaf sheet of paper. Presentation is very important. That said, make a conscious effort to remember the questions so that you don’t have to rely on your notes. Opening a notebook can be somewhat distracting, and what’s even worse is reading the questions verbatim without making eye contact with the interviewer.”

Once you’ve finished asking all that you’d like to ask, it’s important to close an interview on a good notes, says Daniel. “Rather than fretting about running out of questions, take the left-over time to thank your interviewer and let him or her know how much you’re interested in the position. Cite specifics about why and briefly reiterate a key point about your background that relates to the position. This is called the ‘close,’ and it’s a critical phase of the interview.”

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Reference: http://mashable.com/2011/11/20/job-interview-tips/

3 Simple Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level [TIPS]


Implementing the following three steps can be extremely useful in making this decision: 

Step One: Know what you want!

To get what you want, you first need to have a clear picture of your desire. Take time to think about what you want in life and what would it feel like to have it. If you merely want a paycheck, for example, you can get one in a job you hate or one you love. Which would you prefer? List your criteria for living well, for having that desire.

When you have a vision of where you want to be, set goals to help you move toward that vision. If, for instance, you want financial independence at a certain age, set incremental goals each year to get you there. The picture or vision will enable you to reach those incremental goals much easier, as the vision pulls you forward.

Set up a crossroads debrief meeting with yourself (or a partner) to review and make a list of what you have done since your last debrief or the past year. If this sounds overwhelming, here is a suggestion: Just as you write status reports to your managers, you can write one to yourself. This personal status report listing your accomplishments each month can be a useful tool for keeping track of your actions while moving you towards your goals and maintaining your motivation. Can you imagine what a jaw-dropping, eye-popping, good feeling experience it will be to review those accomplishments at year end?

Questions to consider:

  • What happened since my last crossroads debrief?
  • What goals have I reached?
  • Where am I on the goals not yet completed?
  • What were my most proud achievements? What did I do to reach them?
  • What challenges/difficult situations occurred? How did I handle them?
  • What did I do well? What would I like to do better?
  • Where do I want to go from here?

Step Two: Feel and act as if it already is here!

Today’s world is a difficult place-recession, workforce reductions, more work and less time, etc. All these circumstances can lead to difficult options. Let’s remember we always have a choice even when faced with alternatives we don’t care for. We can choose to be a victim (why me?) or we can choose to look for opportunities and move on! Step 2 is about taking responsibility for our attitude, emotions, and choices.

A great model I use comes from The Oz Principle by Roger Connors, Tom Smith, and Craig HickmanAbove the Line(Steps to accountability) and Below the Line (the Blame Game).

Below the Line is where we take on the role of victim. We play the Blame Game-why me? Why did they (whoever “they” are) do this to me? We stay stuck in anger, frustration, wishing for what was. We take a wait and see attitude, confused about what to do next, or in denial until our deepest fears happen. How does staying in this ‘victim mentality‘ serve you? Would you not rather be Above the Line, taking accountability for your feelings, reactions, and choices?

This is a four-step process:

1) See it – recognize and acknowledge the current situation and your feelings about it.

2) Own it accepting responsibility for where you are now. Your choices led you to this moment.

3) Solve it – finding and implementing solutions; perhaps as simple as updating your resume; thinking about what value you bring to the marketplace based on its needs, etc.

4) Do it – implement your plan, one small step at a time.

Step three: Be open to receiving it!

Now that you have put things in motion and feeling hopeful and motivated, it is important to be open to receiving the opportunities you want. Sound ridiculous? “Of course, I will,” you say! Sometimes we want something and deep down we do not believe we will find it. You could be thinking, “The economy is bad so there is no way I could get the job I want!” Or, “I will never find the relationship I want”, or… This way of thinking is NOT being open to receive!

Keep in mind possibilities are endless. Be open and know the opportunities best fitted for you are on the way. Otherwise, you may never see them coming!

Chris Sier

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Reference: http://www.careerconsult.co.cc/2011/04/career-crossroads-review-strategy-3.html

My Favorite Quotations [Author’s Choice]


Confidence Confidence comes not from always being right but from Not Fearing to be Wrong.

Criticism One has right to criticize, if has solution.

Fun You have the right to remain Silent, What you lack is the ability…

Don’t take life so seriously. It isn’t permanent…
Don’t interrupt Me While I’m Ignoring you.

If at first you don’t succeed, remove all evidence you ever tried.

Lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part.

We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons.

Hope, Courage & Effort You can’t put a difference unless you put a lot of Effort.

I do not compare me with others; I compare myself with my last performance. (Bill Gates)

Even the word ‘IMPOSSIBLE’ says “I M POSSIBLE.”

Hope is independent of the apparatus of logic.

A broken hand works, but not a broken heart.

Never, Never, Never, Give Up … (Churchill)

If you think you have it tough, read history books.

Death Some people are so afraid to die that they never begin to live.

Death is more universal than life; everyone has to die but no one lives forever.

Education & Learning If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples then you and I will still each has one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas. (George Bernard Shaw)

Not to know is bad, not to wish to know is worse.

Never stop learning; knowledge doubles every fourteen months.

I do not think, I just experiment.

Ignorance is a form of environmental pollution.

Make sure what you say is only the tip of iceberg of what you know.

Tell me and I forget, Show me and I remember, Let me Do and I Understand. (Confucius)

Every time I know, I feel myself more illiterate. (July 2012, Haseeb Akmal)

Friendship It is easier to forgive an enemy than to forgive a friend.

Only your real friends will tell you when your face is dirty.

Friends are like stars. You can’t always see them, but you know they are always there for you.

Don’t explain. Your friends do not need it, and your enemies will not believe you. (Paulo Coelho)

Islam When I Go To The West, I See Islam Without Muslims. But When I Come Back To The East, I See Muslims Without Islam. (Dr. Allama Muhammad Iqbal)

Job Career & Work The difference between a job and a career is the difference between forty and sixty hours a week.

Anyone who can walk to welfare office can walk to work.

Never do work with two hands. Use one for announcement.

If you have to do it, Do it with Excellence.

I work better if passionate about it. (Sep 2012, Haseeb Akmal)

Kindness We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

Leadership Leadership means action, not position.

Action should be in direction.

Be player, not commentator.

Love I am amazed how people find time to hate when the life is too short to love.

To love and to be loved is to feel the sunlight from both the sides.

Love and imagination can change the world.

Are we not like two volumes of one book?

Love is a game that two can play and both win.

Mistake The man who is incapable of making a mistake is incapable of anything.

I am thankful to failure, it tells my weakness.

FAIL: First Attempt In Learning.

Plan Failing to Plan is Planning to fail.

It is better to be a good Artist than to be a bad Engineer.

Prayer When you pray, rather let your heart be without words than your words without heart.

Problem The best way to get rid of a problem is to solve it.

A well stated problem is a problem half solved.

Intellectuals solve problems; Geniuses prevent them.

I do not wish for less problems, instead I wish for more skills.

Everything will be OK in the End, if it’s not OK it’s NOT the End.

Question He who asks a question remains fool for five minutes; he who does not ask the question, remains fool forever.

Reality Listening to both sides of a story will convince you that there is more to a story than both sides.

All people smile in the same language.

Safety Ship is always safe at shore but it is not built for it.

It is easy to be brave from a safe distance.

Success No best revenge I know other than Success. (Sep 12, Haseeb Akmal)

Sorry Why it is easier to get forgiveness than permission?

Technology Technology not solves, just facilitates.

War War does not determine who’s right, it determines who’s left.

Do you like them? Want to add your favorite sayings?

 

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